Fashion and shopping, Melbourne style

___________________________

Unless otherwise indicated, all photographs and artworks on this website are copyright
of So Not A Princess and must not be reproduced without permission.


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License.

___________________________

Powered by Squarespace

Entries in 1980s (27)

Thursday
Jan042018

Earring in the New Year

Recently I’ve had a real bonanza on vintage earring finds in op shops (thrift stores).

The first pair that caught my eye (below) in a Sacred Heart secondhand shop were red and navy clip on baubles that are suspended on chain. The navy beads have dotted lines around the centre, so that they look like cricket balls. I guessed they were 1960s or 70s, so I thought $5 was a fair enough price for them.

The following four pairs were all bought on the same day, in two Salvos stores.

The very fun French flag hoops are made of enamel (70s or 80s?), and were the cheapest of the lot, costing all of $1. They were actually an afterthought purchase, serendipitously spotted at the counter in a sale bin while I waited for my friend to finalise her purchases.

The gold oval hoops and the snaky knot danglers that you see in swinging action are also metal, and both possibly 1970s. Each cost about $3, and were found at the second Salvos store.

And once more in the same shop, I made an afterthought purchase with the 1950s (or 80s?) jumbo pearl clip-ons. I was actually leaving the store when a staff member, busily stocking a display box near the entrance, showed me them to admire. I laughed aloud because they were so enormous, and immediately decided they were so OTT I had to have them. She and I both agreed they looked much better on than in the hand. I think these were $5–6, and worth it for sheer fun.

I remember when 1970s and 80s fashion was considered so passé, hideous even, but given enough time any era regains a lustre. Old things, taken out of their stuffy or old-fashioned contexts, become new again, especially when they are recombined with modern items or things from quite different eras. Tarnish transmogrifies into desirable patina.

Sunday
Dec312017

Firecracker!

Here we are at last – the end of the year. I’d like to say it’s been a blast, but I confess, I won’t shed a tear to see its close, though it seems it’s flashed by so fast. It’s had its joys, and it’s woes, but the time to sing auld lang syne is drawing near.

So I shall say farewell in style, with firecrackers in my ears – a burst of diamonds and a shower of gold to celebrate the year of old—happy New Year, dears!

Monday
Sep112017

Cockatoo Butterflies

I have short hair. So short I can’t even make a pigtail let alone a ponytail. But that did not stop me from cooing over these vintage 80s white cockatoo butterfly clips when I spotted them in a Salvos op shop recently. And at 75¢ each, they were laughably cheep (ahem) and altogether irresistible. They are so cute I would even consider growing my hair long again just so I could wear them!

Friday
Apr142017

Hat Roll-Call

This past year has been a very good year for finding vintage hats in op shops at bargain basement prices. And, I decided, Easter is an eggcellent time to parade some before you (sorry, that was irresistible). These summer hats coincidentally all feature bows.

First up is what I suspect is a 1930s navy and natural straw hat found on one lunchtime spree at a store near my workplace. It does not have a label on the inside, but I am estimating it to be from this era because of the shape and materials that are very similar to another straw 1930s hat I own. The lining of the brim was torn from the crown – easily fixed – and otherwise it is in very good condition and was a steal at $10. It looks very elegant on, and the other great thing is that it fits very tightly, so even a high wind was unable to whip it off my head.

The second hat is possibly from the 1980s. It is a huge cartwheel of natural store, and tied with a black jacquard taffeta bow at the back. The fabric has the distinctive moiré pattern of that formal fabric that was so popular in the Eighties. This does threaten to take flight on a windy day (a hat elastic fixed that), but it offers great shelter from our strong southern sun. A $4 bargain from a little charity store.

Also from the 1980s is this black straw closely-fitting visored hat that I found at the same time as the Prada kepi, in a huge vintage warehouse in Geelong. The deep crown features a black grosgrain ribbon that forms a bow at the back. The visor provides great shelter, though not so at the back clearly. Perhaps I should be wearing it 80s style, with a giant white shirt with the collar turned up to protect my neck? This was another cheapie that cost only $4 (reduced from $8).

I do hope you are all having a very Good Friday!

Photos: March 2017

Monday
Mar272017

Gypsy Mood

“You look like a gypsy!” That was what my mum would say to me years ago when I was attending art school and dressed very colourfully in piles of beads and Indian skirts and vintage clothes that I found in the op shops at lunch time around college.

The word ‘gypsy’ has such picturesque connotations: one thinks of nomadic folk living a bohemian, happy-go-lucky and simple life, thriving on the freedom of travelling wherever whim took them – in quaint little caravans drawn by sturdy horses of course. It’s a romantic notion, and undoubtedly they must endure the harsh realities of life just the same as the less adventurous of us.

I’m not nomadic (although I have travelled a little), but I still sometimes dress like a gypsy, when the mood strikes me.

Fashion Notes

In keeping with gypsy values, I am wearing quite a mish-mash of items, most of which is second hand. The most spectacular piece is the silk taffeta skirt of course, which I bought in an op shop last year for around $7. I wasn’t sure if it was silk at the time, and I doubt the staff member who priced it suspected it was silk; there are no labels in it. I just thought it was fabulous.

The organza blouse is by an Australian designer, Carla Zampatti, and is I think a highly amusing relic from the 80s. The silk shawl around my hips was a birthday gift from a friend, and the pink sequin scarf in my hair was another thrift store find. My jewellery is a mix of vintage (a white 40s bead necklace) and antique (Turkish coin earrings, the Afghan bead tassel); second hand from op shops; new retail, and souvenirs (the bangles, from Vietnam) and even a turquoise ring hand made by me.

Fashion Disaster!

The skirt is extremely well made, with every seam inside perfect, and over-locked, so I didn’t want to even snip a piece from inside to do a burn test and ascertain the fibre content. However, something disastrous happened right after this photoshoot. It was hanging in the bathroom and I inadvertently swiped some Lucas Papaw ointment – which has a petroleum jelly base – on it.

I inadvertently swiped some Lucas Papaw ointment on it.

First I tried spot cleaning the stain with dishwashing liquid (which can work on greasy stains if used immediately). Nothing doing. I left it for a few days while I pondered whether to take it to the dry cleaner. Finally, after doing some research I referred back to my laundering app (‘The Stain’ – highly recommended) on how to deal with oily stains. It doesn’t mention mineral-based oils, but I tried the method of sprinkling talc on the stain and lifting it onto paper towel with the application of heat (using an iron). Then I hand-washed it, immersing the entire skirt to avoid possibly leaving a water-stain (in for a penny, in for a pound).

Then something marvellous happened – aside from the stain lifting: once the skirt was dry, the fabric had softened considerably and I knew without a doubt that it was silk. I assume the previous owner had only ever dry-cleaned it, and that accounted for its starchy crispness. Some may prefer that finish for taffeta, but I think it is much nicer to wear now.

Photos: December 2016